Cottontail

COTTONTAIL — Children can learn about the unique adaptations that help cottontail rabbits survive and thrive in the wild at a free Missouri Department of Conservation online program on Aug. 7.

Cottontail rabbits are frequent sights on evening walks in urban and rural areas. However, if you think this abundance makes them easy pickings for coyotes, bobcats and other wildlife predators looking for a rabbit meal, think again.

Children can learn about a number of unique adaptations cottontail rabbits use to avoid predators and raise their young in the Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) “Little Acorns: Cottontails,” a free virtual program offered from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Aug. 7.

The online program is part of MDC’s “Little Acorns” series of programs and is being put on by the staff of MDC’s Springfield Conservation Nature Center. MDC Naturalist Alan Reed will describe how, although a cottontail rabbit may be a common sight, it has several adaptations that are focused on how to avoid predators. This program is designed for ages 3 to 6, but is open to all ages.

People can register for this program at mdc-event-web.s3licensing.com/Event/EventDetails/173709

Though this program is free, registration is required to participate. Registrants must provide an email, so a program link can be sent to them. This program will include a chat-based question-and-answer period where participants can interact with the presenters.

Staff at MDC facilities across the state are holding virtual programs. A listing of programs can be found at mdc.mo.gov/regions.

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